Author Archive

Stretches for Cyclists

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

Step 1.

Specific Stretches for cyclists
In Standing holding the leg to be stretched just above the ankle pull the leg up behind keeping the torso upright and pushing your hip and chest forward until you feel a stretch down the front of the thigh. X5 20 second holds

Step 2.

Facing a wall place your hands on the wall level with your shoulders. Step back with the leg you wish to stretch and push your knee straight while keeping your heel on the floor. X5 20 second holds

Step 3.

Lying on the floor pull your knee up to your chest with your knee bent. Then try to straighten the knee without letting the hip position alter. Keep the other leg flat on the floor. X5 20 second holds

Step 4.

Lying on your back with your knee at 90 degrees pulled towards your chest/ opposite shoulder gently rotate your lower limb/ankle up towards your chest. X5 20 second holds

Step 5.

Lying on the floor, raise one leg over the other, and place knee on the ground. Using the opposite hand to knee, gently press the knee towards the floor, keeping the opposite arm and shoulder against the ground. X5 20 second holds

Step 6.

Place your hand over the top of our head and pull the head and neck down to the left feeling a stretch in the right upper shoulder and neck muscles. Repeat on right side. X5 10 second holds

Mobility Problems – Can Physiotherapy Help?

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

At SB Sports Injury & Physiotherapy Clinic we offer a private neurological rehabilitation and general mobility problems service. Our Rehabilitation Physiotherapist has over 15 years experience working in the field of rehabilitation treating conditions such as Stroke, Head Injury, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson’s Disease as well as general mobilitly problems. (more…)

Prone leg lifts

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

The Oyster

Friday, April 26th, 2013

A great exercise for engaging a muscle (Gluteus medius), situated around the hip joint. It provides an important function to support/stabilise the pelvis as well as rotating the hip. Not only that, but it helps give tone to the buttock area.

As with all exercises, make sure you take time getting into the starting position and carry out the exercise without rushing. This enables you to perform the movement safely and effectively. A good technique yields better results too!

Oyster-stating-position

  1. Lie in a straight line on your side, bend your knees keeping your feet in line with your bottom.
  2. Use a towel or cushion under the head, making sure your head is in line with the spine.

The Oyster is suitable for conditions such as:

  • Low back pain
  • Sacro-iliac pain
  • some hip symptoms
  • lower limb mal-alignment

For further information about this exercise and others, you can make an appointment to see one of our physiotherapists

The Oyster

 

MOVEMENT

  1. Engage the lower abdominals and pelvic floor gently.
  2. Simultaneously open up the top leg like an oyster shell opening, keeping the heels together.

CHECK POINTS:

  • Keep the waist lengthened away from the shoulder.
  • Make sure neither the pelvis nor spine rotate backwards or forwards during the leg movement; this means only rotating the leg as far as you can keep the pelvis still/stabilised.
  • Align yourself next to a wall if you feel this will help support your pelvis in a more stable position
  • Try doing 2×10 every other day to begin!